Libraries
Libraries are an important resource for homeschoolers. Parents and children value librarians for the expertise they share when navigating the vast amounts of information found in today's libraries. Libraries also provide lending materials, educational materials, meeting space for support groups, and more.
National Libraries
American Memory
American Memory provides free and open access through the Internet to written and spoken words, sound recordings, still and moving images, prints, maps, and sheet music that document the American experience. It is a digital record of American history and creativity. These materials, from the collections of the Library of Congress and other institutions, chronicle historical events, people, places, and ideas that continue to shape America, serving the public as a resource for education and lifelong learning.
Library of Congress
The Library of Congress is the nation's oldest federal cultural institution and serves as the research arm of Congress. It is also the largest library in the world, with millions of books, recordings, photographs, maps and manuscripts in its collections. The Library's mission is to make its resources available and useful to the Congress and the American people and to sustain and preserve a universal collection of knowledge and creativity for future generations.
Libraries & Homeschoolers: Working Together
Homeschooling and Libraries: New Solutions and Opportunities

Homeschools are alwsy looking for alternative ways of schooling that do not necessarily reflect what a typical classroom looks like. Since homeschooling is so diverse across families, information institutions, including public, academic, school, and special libraries may find it challenging to meet all their needs and desires. This collection of essays offers approaches and strategies from library professionals and veteran homeschoolers on how to best serve the needs and experiences of homeschooled youth. This book includes information on special needs homeschooling, gifted students, and African American students as well.

How to Homeschool Using Only the Library

The library is a wonderful resource for any homeschool parent. The resources found there help to enrich the curriculum or you can even use the library for all of your homeschooling material. These tips will help you get the most out of your local library. 

There's No Place Like… the Library!
On the rewards of the library-homeschool relationship, with practical suggestions of ways libraries can cultivate relationships with homeschoolers.
Homeschool Libratory

Homeschoolers value the educational opportunities that libraries provide. Parents often build upon concepts introduced at the library when they get home. And truly, if ever there was a good marriage of programming and circulation, this is it. This case study of a homeschool "libratory" program at the Red Hook Public Library in New York offers a unique look at ways to connect with homeschooling families. 

Homeschooling and Libraries
This blog is written by Adrienne Furness and represents efforts to explore the homeschooling world and help librarians build good relationships with homeschooling families. Adrienne is a freelance writer and Children's Librarian at the Webster Public Library outside of Rochester, New York.
Homeschool Library Connection
The library can be an awesome resource for homeschoolers, but is useless if it doesn't carry the books that homeschoolers need. The sole purpose of the Homeschool Library Connection email list is to help homeschoolers make purchasing suggestions to their public libraries.
The Perfect Partnership: Public Libraries and Homeschoolers
As a community partner, the public library can assist this growing population’s needs. The best scenario is one in which the library staff works with the local homeschool community. 
Homeschooling: Exploring the Potential of Public Library Service for Homeschooled Students

As the number of homeschooled students rises in this country, needs for resources, instruction and support also has risen. The homeschooled students, while not participating in the school classrooms and by extension the school or public libraries, have needs that should be satisfied by library services. These include access to materials and technology, information literacy skills instruction, reading and writing support, curriculum materials and methods, reference services, as well as areas to “make and take”, facilities for quiet study or to meet with mentors or tutors. In addition, homeschooled students need the kind of library skills instruction that all students in traditional school libraries receive. The purpose of this study is to identify the strengths and weaknesses of library support to homeschooled students and to make recommendations based upon analysis. 

Libraries and Homeschools: The Perfect Partnership

This articles details all the ways that libraries can assist and support homeschoolers, including meeting spaces, collections of local materials, lectures and programs, book discussions, foreign language materials, and so much more.

Homeschoolers and Public Libraries: A Synergistic Relationship

Homeschoolers are commonly heavy users of their local libraries. Statistics show that more than 78 percent of home educators use the public library as their primary resource for curriculum supported materials. So, how do libraries become educational “hubs” for homeschoolers? They develop programs and services to support this burgeoning population by offering programs, digital information, and events that support homeschooling families. The energy and vibrant curiosity that home-educated children have, and the commitment and support their parents contribute, make libraries a better place for all. 

Featured Resources

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The Organizing Sourcebook : Nine Strategies for Simplifying Your Life
The nine habits of highly organized people Organizing consultant Kathy Waddill demonstrates how the simple act of being organized can improve your quality of life. In The Organizing Sourcebook, she presents nine organizing principles that can easily be applied to any situation, activity, or environment. The book gives you the tools for managing time; decreasing stress; and dealing with cultural, personal, and emotional change. Case histories illustrate how each strategy solved a specific proble...
More Charlotte Mason Education: A Home Schooling How-To Manual
After providing an important work in explaining the Charlotte Mason method for homeschoolers, Catherine Levison goes deeper into the use of this method in the home with her subsequent work. This book expands the information from the first book and offers ideas to incorporate the rich and uplifting philosophy into your home education. There are specific tips for high school, schooling through challenges, and more. 
Catholic Homeschool Companion
Here’s your one-stop resource for information, insight, and inspiration about every aspect of educating your children at home — written by those who understand it best: homeschooling parents themselves! Would you like to teach science or phonics better? Introduce your child to Latin, piano, or great works of art? Try new classroom approaches that other parents find effective? In these pages, you’ll find helpful essays from more than forty veteran homeschooling parents to help you do all this and...
The Outdoor Life of Children: The Importance of Nature Study and Outside Activities (Charlotte Mason Topics - Volume 2
The methods of Charlotte Mason are popular among homeschoolers. She includes nature study as a crucial element. This work explores the idea of the outdoors as a classroom for children, and gives tips on ways of teaching the sciences, history, literature, music, and art through the use of outdoor space. 
English from the Roots Up
English from the Roots Up explores the Latin and Greek roots of words. Many people haven't realized how valuable the Latin and Greek vocabulary is in the formulation of the finely structured English vocabulary of today. Even learning a few Latin and Greek root words gets you hooked and you want to learn more. Why? Because you can move from "what words mean" to "why words mean"&mdashin short, a thinking vocabulary. You'll find product information here.